Date Archives: October 2021

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October
25

Interior Design Trends to Try This Fall

Fall Interior Design The season of pumpkin spice, sweater weather, and apple-everything is here, and our brokers want to make sure you're ready for the fall interior design trends. Pumpkin décor is a forever favorite, but there are many other brilliant ways to dress your home for the season. Thankfully, the fall interior design trends for 2021 have something for everyone. We're talking layering, vintage décor, cozy autumnal shades, natural elements, and more. It's time to make your home feel festive and comforting. Here are the most prevalent home decor trends for you to experiment with this fall.

  • Cozy Fabrics and Natural Textures
    As the weather turns colder, ultra-soft fabrics are a must, and natural texture is a key trend for 2021. People are drawn to a sophisticated, chic, and cozy feel in their homes. Layering chunky knitted blankets and furry fabrics with velvets and other rich, textured fabrics will give your space a warm and welcoming fall vibe. 


  • Vintage Decor
    Vintage pieces and family heirlooms are definitely trending. As much as modern décor is adored, the pandemic seems to have promoted homeowners to turn to the past with their designs. They want accessories and furnishings with character and nostalgia. For some, this means dusting off old furniture, vases, candlesticks, and picture frames to bring a sense of security from the past. For others, it's all about breaking out their grandmother's 1940s colored glassware. Whatever antique pieces you have, mixing them with more contemporary pieces can go a long way to keep your space from getting too dated.


  • Nature-Inspired Colors
    Red, yellow, and orange are the conventional fall colors, but designers are increasingly gravitating towards other nature-inspired hues. These are warm, richer tones such as blues, deep greens, and browns. These colors signify renewal, hope, and freshness. You can use them to add a layer of character and sophistication to your living space without overpowering it. To make these colors feel appropriate for the season, use them in deeper shades and complement them with warm undertones. Line your dining room table with a navy blue runner and layer in a few pillows in forest green to set off the rest of your yellow and orange décor. Incorporating metal decorative accents is also a great way to provide a pop of color and add contrast to a design.


  • Emphasis on Nature and Natural Elements
    This fall presents a great opportunity to bring the outdoors inside. The pandemic has taught us how much better life is when we sit outside and connect to nature. The trend of creating fluidity between indoors and outdoors spaces is here to stay. This doesn't mean turning your home into a greenhouse, it's about incorporating natural fabrications and furnishings into your decor. You can also bring in some heard-wearing plants and maximize natural light.


  • Beyond the Open Floor Plan
    We hate to see this one go, but the open floor concept is becoming something of the past. The past year and a half have seen us use the spaces in our home much differently than before. We've realized that the open floor plan may be ideal for entertaining, but not so much for everyday life. Instead of having large open spaces where furniture floats, consider using room dividers and partitions to add versatility to your space. Create a home office, gym, or any other functional space.
  • Add Shapes
    Juxtaposition is big when it comes to the top fall interior décor trends of 2021. People are becoming more adventurous with their furnishings, where soft edges meet hard lines. This is more prominent in coffee tables, contemporary wall art, patterned rugs, and vases. Curved and shapely vessels and furniture tend to create quiet drama in neutral spaces and add a much-needed distraction from the angular lines of your other furnishings. Throw some shapes in to create contrast and draw the eye across the space.


  • Plaid and Stripes
    The two most useable patterns have united to create the perfect fall complement and add some interest into every corner of your home. You can jump onboard the plaid and stripes bandwagon by mixing the prints with your throws, bedding, cushions, and curtains. Go for black and white patterns mixed with red, coral, and brown accents. Patterned rugs are also great for layering under more neutral rugs to give them a bit of edge without it being overwhelming.

Planning to buy a new home this fall? We're here to help you find your dream home in the Pacific Northwest. Contact us today to learn more about our services.

October
18

About the Pacific Crest Trail

Pacific Crest Trail

Spanning 2,650 miles from the Mexican border in the south to the Canadian border in the north, the Pacific Crest Trail is to the West Coast what the Appalachian Trail is to the East Coast. Our brokers take a look at this iconic hiking destination that's within convenient distance of Bend homes for sale.

History of the Pacific Crest Trail

The first seeds of the Pacific Crest Trail were planted right here in Oregon. Fred Cleator, a supervisor in the U.S. Forest Service, first mapped the state's Skyline Trail in 1920 and started plans for a similar route in Washington.

At the time, the Boy Scouts, Sierra Club, and other organizations were floating various ideas for hiking trails. In 1926, Catherine Montgomery, a teacher in Bellingham, WA, became the first to propose a contiguous hiking trail through the three West Coast states. 

Mountain League of Los Angeles chairman Clinton C. Clarke was inspired to unite these groups into one cohesive effort when he organized the Pacific Crest Trail System Conference in 1932. The conference, which counted legendary nature photographer Ansel Adams among its committee members, led to Clarke becoming known as the father of the Pacific Crest Trail.

Finally, during President Lyndon B. Johnson's administration, Congress passed the National Trails System Act on October 2, 1968. In addition to setting forth the administrative framework for a nationwide system of trails, this officially named the Pacific Crest Trail and the Appalachian Trail as the country's first scenic trails. 

Fun Facts About the Pacific Crest Trail

  • At loose ends after the death of her mother, writer Cheryl Strayed began a journey on the Pacific Crest Trail despite no previous hiking experience. Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail details the highs and lows of her 1,100-mile journey. The memoir, along with the movie adapted from the book and starring Reese Witherspoon, created a spike of interest in the Pacific Crest Trail.

  • Anyone hiking or horseback riding 500 miles or more in a continuous trip must obtain a permit. While there is no charge for a permit, they are issued on a first-come-first-served basis and limited by quota. Day and overnight use permits are also required in 33 places along the Pacific Crest Trail, including Crater Lake National Park, Mount Jefferson Wilderness, and Three Sisters Wilderness in Oregon.

  • How long does it take to traverse the entire length of the Pacific Crest Trail? While some elite athletes have accomplished it in as little as two months, the average time is approximately five months. Expenses run anywhere from $4,000-$8,000, depending on how frugal or extravagant a hiker chooses to be.

  • While no formal statistics are currently kept, the self-reported "2,600 Miler List" includes 7,936 people, 100 of whom have completed the trail more than once. The annual number peaked in 2018 when 1,185 completions were reported. Total number of permits issued for all usage has grown from 1,879 in 2013 to 7,888 in 2019.

Pacific Crest Trail Hikes Near Bend

  • Experienced hikers who are up for a challenge are rewarded with spectacular views after reaching the summit of Diamond Peak, one of Oregon's Matterhorns. The 13.8-mile dog-friendly trail is described as a "scramble," which is the term for a route that's more difficult than regular hiking but not quite to the level of rock-climbing. Unlike most mountains that are relatively symmetrical, Diamond Peak has a jagged profile that's been compared to the back of a stegosaurus. 

  • Twin Peaks, more familiarly known as the Twins, is a volcano that gained its name from the dual summits formed by a gap in the crater rim. This 6.7-mile dog-friendly route crosses the Pacific Crest Trail on its way to views of both Twins along with Mount Jefferson, Mount McLaughlin, and other parts of the Cascades. The real showstopper is Waldo Lake, a popular Oregon attraction that's the second-largest natural freshwater lake in the state behind Crater Lake.

  • North, Middle, and South make up the Three Sisters that are the centerpiece of the eponymous Wilderness Area. Skirt the permit requirement by hiking the Scott Trail, a dog-friendly route marked by alpine meadows full of wildflowers. Along with the Three Sisters, the summit features views of Collier Glacier, the largest glacier in Oregon, situated between North and Middle Sisters.

The best part of any journey is returning to your dream home in Bend. Whether you're buying or selling a house, contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain for cheerful and professional help with Bend real estate.

October
4

Pacific Northwest Fall Foliage Tour

Pacific Northwest Fall

Is it possible that Pacific Northwest scenery can get even more spectacular? While we love this area in all seasons, there's something extra special about the fall. See Washington and Oregon dressed up in their fall colors at these beautiful locations as recommended by our brokers.

  • Kubota Garden - 9817 - 55th Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98118
    Two words used most often by people to describe dog-friendly Kubota Garden: "hidden gem." Namesake Fujitaro Kubota and his son Tom envisioned their property as a public space to be enjoyed by all. In 1987, the City of Seattle purchased the land to complete that mission. More than 140 varieties of Japanese maples fill the garden with brilliant fall hues, while the waterfall and fish pond add a touch of Zen. Kubota Garden is open daily from sunrise to sunset, and admission is free.

  • Washington Park Arboretum - 2300 Arboretum Dr. E., Seattle, WA 98112
    Set in 230 lush acres on the shores of Lake Washington, the Washington Park Arboretum offers something different with each visit. Themed gardens, such as Rhododendron Glen and Azalea Way, highlight specific plants and landscapes. Take a canoe or kayak out on Union Bay for a chance to spot hawks, owls, and other magnificent birds. Kids have fun learning about nature while they complete the fall scavenger hunt. There's no charge to visit the Arboretum, which is open seven days a week from dawn to dusk. 

  • Discovery Park - 3801 Discovery Park Blvd., Seattle, WA 98199
    Framed by the Olympic Mountains to the west and the Cascades in the east, Discovery Park features some of the more spectacular scenery around. At 534 acres, Discovery Park is the largest city park in Seattle, and it provides a welcome oasis to the surrounding urban hustle and bustle. Surrounded by sand dunes, cliffs, and forest groves, you'll feel like you're in another world. Park hours are 4 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. daily.

  • Lincoln Park - 8011 Fauntleroy Way SW, Seattle, WA 98136
    Tucked inside West Seattle, one of the city's oldest neighborhoods, is Lincoln Park. While it's much smaller than many of the other city parks, Lincoln Park has a wide variety of attractions that make it a favorite destination for families. Features include 4.6 miles of walking paths, 3.9 miles of biking paths, picnic shelters, and a renovated play area. Fall is a prime time for spotting orcas, seals, sea lions and porpoise out on Puget Sound. Lincoln Park is open seven days a week from 4 a.m. - 11:30 p.m.

  • Pittock Mansion - 3229 NW Pittock Dr., Portland, OR 97210
    In 1853, 19-year-old Henry Pittock heeded the call to "go west, young man." After moving from Pittsburgh to Portland, Henry became a successful businessman and built Pittock Mansion. Today, the stately home serves as a museum dedicated to the legacy of Henry Pittock and the story of Portland's development over the years. The 46-acre grounds include trails for viewing trees, flowers, and panoramas of the city skyline and the Cascade Mountains. Pittock Mansion is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. except for Tuesday, when doors open at noon. Admission is $12 for adults and $8 for ages 6-18.

  • Hoyt Arboretum - 4000 SW Fairview Blvd., Portland, OR 97221
    When Portland purchased 189 acres of land for $10 in 1922, the property was earmarked for development. Thanks to the efforts of key supporters, the land became the home of Hoyt Arboretum. More than 2,300 different tree species from more than six continents can be seen on the grounds, which is a greater number than any other arboretum in the country. Twelve miles of hiking trails provide opportunities to view Japanese maples, redwoods, flowering dogwoods, and many rare species. Watch for hawthorne fruits, magnolia cones, and snowberries, which take center stage during fall months. Hours are 5 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily, and there is no charge for admission.

  • South Park Blocks - 1436 SW Park Ave., Portland, OR 97201
    Don't have time for a day trip? Just head downtown to the South Park Blocks, a charming green space just north of Portland State University. The 12-block area was one of the city's first parks, dating back to 1852, and the tree-lined corridor is still a popular spot to enjoy a slice of nature. Mosaics, sculptures, and other artworks along the way add to the visual appeal. Park hours are 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. daily.

Whether you're looking for natural or urban delights, the Pacific Northwest has it all. Contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain for help with all your real estate needs.

Disclaimer: All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal. Neither listing broker(s) or information provider(s) shall be responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, misprints and shall be held totally harmless. Listing(s) information is provided for consumers personal, non-commercial use and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing. Information on this site was last updated 09/29/2022. The listing information on this page last changed on 09/29/2022. The data relating to real estate for sale on this website comes in part from the Internet Data Exchange program of RMLS (last updated Thu 09/29/2022 12:50:32 AM EST) or Willamette Valley MLS (last updated Wed 09/28/2022 11:51:47 PM EST) or COAR/MLSCO (last updated Wed 09/28/2022 11:31:24 PM EST) or NWMLS (last updated Thu 09/29/2022 1:23:54 AM EST). Real estate listings held by brokerage firms other than Coldwell Banker Bain may be marked with the Internet Data Exchange logo and detailed information about those properties will include the name of the listing broker(s) when required by the MLS. All rights reserved. --

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